Via the Terrible Apologies blog:

Chief Mark Kessler is an actual Gilberton, Pennsylvania police chief currently getting YouTube famous for dropping f-bombs and blasting gunfire all over the rural landscape. By the way, his colorful use of the language is most definitely Not Safe For Work, so be careful about where you watch these admittedly hilarious videos.

1. Leaving aside the fact that it’s a fake apology, this is almost certainly the worst apology ever.

2. These are your tax dollars at work, Gilberton, PA residents.

HT: D. Harland Harris.

Kessler points out that he’s not doing anything illegal; he has the freedom to curse on YouTube as much as he’d like and it’s apparently not illegal to randomly fire these sorts of weapons where he lives.

But that doesn’t mean he’s not a complete moron, which he plainly is.

# YouTube # internet # Mark Kessler # guns # politics # Pennsylvania

reblogged from Terrible Apologies

Presented without further comment is Slavoj Zizek singing “The Great Pretender,” originally by The Platters.

OK, maybe just one comment:

The repetition of the clip where he’s staring into space and smoothing his mustache, without any words at all, is the key to the whole thing.

HT: Marco Abel.

(Source: critical-theory.com)

# Žižek # music # YouTube # comedy # internet # philosophy

So … Paula Deen took down her first apology video [preserved for posterity here] and is trying again with this second apology video (which Zach Preiksa sent my way only moments ago).

This version seems more personal, a bit more sincere, and a lot less edited. Here, she not only apologizes to the people she offended with her racist remarks and omits any mention of how she’d like to continue on with her business of selling unhealthy food to everyone, but she also explains her last-minute cancelation of the “Today” appearance with Matt Lauer.

It’s almost as if her PR team is trying to respond to criticism in real time.

Anyone like this apology video better? What are the odds that we’ll get a third one before close of business today?

# terrible apologies # Paula Deen # food # racism # YouTube # internet # television # apology

And now, after that last post on good apologies, it’s right back to my usual Terrible Apologies:

For being only forty-five seconds, there’s so much in this public apology that doesn’t work, it’s hard to know quite where to begin.

Deen repeatedly references “the wrong” without actually talking about it; she says that she wants “to grow from this” without explaining what that will entail; and she seems to suggest that it only recently occured to her that “Inappropriate hurtful language is totally, totally unacceptable” (which is, of course, definitional).

But, of course, the most noteworthy failure is that it’s hard to escape the sense that Deen’s apology is entirely motivated by her desire to avoid the extreme cost of being identifed as a racist. Indeed, she concludes by asking for forgiveness not from the people she directly offended but from “my children, my team, my fans, my partners.” The references to fans and especially her team and partners comes precariously close to just saying what she really means, “Please don’t let this cost me anything.”

# terrible apologies # racism # food # television # apology # Paula Deen # YouTube # internet

reblogged from Terrible Apologies

Alongside public threats and discreet messages, Israel is employing unusual means of persuasion: viral video clips like those distributed by Israel’s embassy in Washington. The first amusing video clip, which was made with the festive themes of Thanksgiving and Christmas, shows a celebratory dinner that is attended by world leaders seeking to advance peace. But who didn’t show up? Abbas.
In the second video clip, Israel’s embassy in Washington shows Abbas driving the Palestinian bus toward the abyss. If you think about it, an almost identical clip could be easily created to show Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu doing the same.

I don’t know about you, but I’m pretty excited for the day when all the nations of the world settle their differences with YouTube videos. Of course, Israel actually settles its disputes with airstrikes … and then it heads over to YouTube for a little comedy afterward.
The absolutely idiotic videos are here and here.

Alongside public threats and discreet messages, Israel is employing unusual means of persuasion: viral video clips like those distributed by Israel’s embassy in Washington. The first amusing video clip, which was made with the festive themes of Thanksgiving and Christmas, shows a celebratory dinner that is attended by world leaders seeking to advance peace. But who didn’t show up? Abbas.

In the second video clip, Israel’s embassy in Washington shows Abbas driving the Palestinian bus toward the abyss. If you think about it, an almost identical clip could be easily created to show Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu doing the same.

I don’t know about you, but I’m pretty excited for the day when all the nations of the world settle their differences with YouTube videos. Of course, Israel actually settles its disputes with airstrikes … and then it heads over to YouTube for a little comedy afterward.

The absolutely idiotic videos are here and here.

# Israel # Palestinians # internet # YouTube # comedy # sadness # global affairs # politics # news # technology

In the second episode of Julian Assange’s ridiculous show, we’re treated to a rogue’s gallery straight out of a Dick Tracy cartoon. I can’t imagine that anyone thought a serious conversation might be had by putting these three men together.

My favorite thing about this video, of course, is that it takes only four minutes before Žižek is yelling and gesticulating to the extent that he has to be physically restrained by Assange, as though he might hit or throw the laptop on which Horowitz’s image appears.

I also like that, at about the 8:30 mark, Žižek completely dodges Assange’s question about how he would feel if Wikileaks published internal documents from a hypothetical revolutionary government … with a joke about sending Assange to the gulag.

This, apparently, is how an "intellectual superstar" philosopher engages in discussion.

# Assange # Wikileaks # Horowitz # internet # YouTube # Žižek # philosophy # comedy # politics

Bon Iver has posted a new video on the band’s YouTube page featuring frontman Justin Vernon and drummer Sean Carey performing five of the group’s songs on dueling grand pianos. The video was shot at the stunning AIR Studio’s Lyndhurst Hall in London and show Vernon and Carey facing each other on opposing pianos as they work through stripped bare versions of “Hinnom, TX,” “Wash.,” and “Beth/Rest” from Bon Iver, “Babys” from the Blood Bank EP, and the single “I Can’t Make You Love Me.”

As my friend Michael Tofias pointed out in an email message today, Sean Carey is “clearly an unsung hero of bon iver.”

(Video via All Songs Considered.)

# music # YouTube # internet

Amnesty International has released the first episode of Amnesty TV, its latest foray into making human rights more ubiquitous in our lives. I applaud the concept, but I’m pretty far from convinced on the execution (no pun intended).

Bringing short video clips about human rights to people via YouTube seems right. Adding in sketch comedy or other general wackiness to break the tension seems odd. Admittedly, I try to keep the mood relatively light in my human rights class, as it can be quite difficult to spend hour after hour droning (again, pardon the pun) on and on about terrible abuse and expect students to remain engaged and not despondent. But, at least at this point, I’ve steered clear of doing impressions or pratfalls and my sense is that it’s probably been a good decision.

# Amnesty International # YouTube # television # human rights # education

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