I’d say my favorite part of Twitter right now is sethkjolly, who was pretty sure I wasn’t going to post this little festival of high-fiving himself from the other day because, after all, I’m not tofias:

So … this is what you’re missing if you don’t spend all day on Twitter.

I’d say my favorite part of Twitter right now is sethkjolly, who was pretty sure I wasn’t going to post this little festival of high-fiving himself from the other day because, after all, I’m not tofias:

So … this is what you’re missing if you don’t spend all day on Twitter.

# Twitter # internet # comedy # inside joke

You know who likes my blogging?
Roseanne, apparently.

You know who likes my blogging?

Roseanne, apparently.

# television # Twitter # internet # comedy

My first tweet, nearly six years ago, was remarkably prescient given how little I’ve slept in the years since I wrote it.

My first tweet, nearly six years ago, was remarkably prescient given how little I’ve slept in the years since I wrote it.

# Twitter # internet

Day, made.
[And, yes, I know it’s not the Darth Vader; we all saw him die over Endor, obviously.]

Day, made.

[And, yes, I know it’s not the Darth Vader; we all saw him die over Endor, obviously.]

# Star Wars # Twitter # internet # comedy

This guy was really on a roll yesterday; the above is just a little bit of the lengthy “offensivethan” rant to which the Madman (or his .com team) treated his Twitter followers.

He had earlier “apologized" for calling President Obama a "subhuman mongrel" but only after it was made clear to him that he’d embarrassed some of his high-profile friends in the GOP. Indeed, in his "apology,” he made it clear that he wasn’t really apologizing, but that his friends — like Rick Perry and Greg Abbott — required him to say something because he was making them look like horrible racists for associating with a horrible racist like him.

He then vowed to continue his biting criticism, but in less overtly racist language … like this stuff on Twitter, I guess.

Either way, someone needs to buy him a new keyboard; the space bar seems to be stuck on his.

# Nugent # music # politics # apology # racism # terrible apologies # Obama # Perry # Texas # Twitter # internet

It’s starting to seem like Nicholas Kristof had a bad break-up with a political scientist at some point in his past or else that he’s never actually read anything written by a political scientist.
But, anyhow, here’s a real world application of my training as a political scientist: I know a bunch of Greek words that prevent me from embarrassing myself when I’m lazily throwing shade at an entire academic discipline.

It’s starting to seem like Nicholas Kristof had a bad break-up with a political scientist at some point in his past or else that he’s never actually read anything written by a political scientist.

But, anyhow, here’s a real world application of my training as a political scientist: I know a bunch of Greek words that prevent me from embarrassing myself when I’m lazily throwing shade at an entire academic discipline.

# political science # politics # Twitter # comedy

Here’s my lone (and pretty tongue-in-cheek) contribution to the wailing and gnashing of teeth inspired by Nicholas Kristof’s Sunday op-ed about the lack of real world engagement by university professors (especially political scientists).
No word yet from Human Rights Watch’s Kenneth Roth or Kristof on their reactions to my argument. I assume I’ll hear back once they’ve had more time to read and digest the points I made about the way a philosophical grounding that works in a pluralistic society impacts people who want to shore up the idea of human rights and prevent real world abuses.
Some excellent responses to Kristof can be found here, here, here, and here.

Here’s my lone (and pretty tongue-in-cheek) contribution to the wailing and gnashing of teeth inspired by Nicholas Kristof’s Sunday op-ed about the lack of real world engagement by university professors (especially political scientists).

No word yet from Human Rights Watch’s Kenneth Roth or Kristof on their reactions to my argument. I assume I’ll hear back once they’ve had more time to read and digest the points I made about the way a philosophical grounding that works in a pluralistic society impacts people who want to shore up the idea of human rights and prevent real world abuses.

Some excellent responses to Kristof can be found here, here, here, and here.

# philosophy # political science # Human Rights Watch # human rights # Twitter # comedy # politics # NYT # media

There’s no real reason for me to put this here.

On the other hand, there’s no reason not to.

So, here’s: Celebrities Read Mean Tweets #6 (by Jimmy Kimmel Live).

# comedy # Twitter # internet # television

reblogged from Waiting On Oblivion
Apparently Americans who don’t know how to use contractions also don’t much care for commericals in which the lyrics to songs about America are translated into a variety of languages.
USA! USA! USA!

Apparently Americans who don’t know how to use contractions also don’t much care for commericals in which the lyrics to songs about America are translated into a variety of languages.

USA! USA! USA!

# Twitter # sports # football # NFL # racism # comedy # sadness # internet # advertising

My “State of the Union” evening in tweets.

# politics # Twitter

A fair number of Nebraskans apparently have absolutely nothing troubling them. As a result, they’ve gotten themselves all worked up about a bill that would allow the Tourism Commission to change the state’s official slogan … because they don’t want the unofficial slogan to be changed:

The Nebraska Tourism Commission is in the final stages of a study to come up with a new, and official, state slogan and symbol to better promote the state for visitors. But several citizens appear ready to fight to keep Nebraska’s unofficial tag line, “The Good Life,” which has been stamped on state highway signs for decades.The idea is to give the state a more up-to-date “brand” to attract visitors, said Kathy McKillip, executive director of the tourism commission.The official state slogan dates to 1963: “Welcome to NEBRASKAland: Where the West Begins.” McKillip suggested that it might be time to retire “The Good Life,” too.On Wednesday, a bill was introduced in the Legislature to give the tourism agency the power to change the state symbol and slogan.

This is one of those times when you have to really question the virtues of democratic governance. Everyone assumes that the state slogan is “The Good Life” and so, when someone suggests changing the slogan, they become irate. They don’t, however, look up the actual state slogan. Instead, they just yell at one poor legislator who just wanted to empower the Tourism Commission to change the terrible old slogan from 1963 that no one even knows is the official state slogan:

Claims that LB1024 repeals “The Good Life” are inaccurate. My statement correcting the record: http://t.co/Tm6XH7A8lz
— Heath Mello (@heathmello)
January 22, 2014
Meanwhile, my own slogan — “Nothing to see right here but just keep driving and I promise you’ll see something nice” — is seemingly not up for serious consideration.

A fair number of Nebraskans apparently have absolutely nothing troubling them. As a result, they’ve gotten themselves all worked up about a bill that would allow the Tourism Commission to change the state’s official slogan … because they don’t want the unofficial slogan to be changed:

The Nebraska Tourism Commission is in the final stages of a study to come up with a new, and official, state slogan and symbol to better promote the state for visitors. 

But several citizens appear ready to fight to keep Nebraska’s unofficial tag line, “The Good Life,” which has been stamped on state highway signs for decades.

The idea is to give the state a more up-to-date “brand” to attract visitors, said Kathy McKillip, executive director of the tourism commission.

The official state slogan dates to 1963: “Welcome to NEBRASKAland: Where the West Begins.” McKillip suggested that it might be time to retire “The Good Life,” too.

On Wednesday, a bill was introduced in the Legislature to give the tourism agency the power to change the state symbol and slogan.

This is one of those times when you have to really question the virtues of democratic governance. Everyone assumes that the state slogan is “The Good Life” and so, when someone suggests changing the slogan, they become irate. They don’t, however, look up the actual state slogan. Instead, they just yell at one poor legislator who just wanted to empower the Tourism Commission to change the terrible old slogan from 1963 that no one even knows is the official state slogan:

Meanwhile, my own slogan — “Nothing to see right here but just keep driving and I promise you’ll see something nice” — is seemingly not up for serious consideration.

# Nebraska # democracy # Twitter # comedy # politics

We’re taking the kids to Sesame Street Live this weekend and this is the description of the show:

No matter where you’re from or where you’ve been, everyone is special – so join in! Elmo, Grover, Abby Cadabby, and their Sesame Street friends welcome Chamki, Grover’s friend from India, to Sesame Street. Together, they explore the universal fun of friendship and celebrate cultural similarities, from singing and dancing, to sharing cookies!

Given that it reads like something out of Rush Limbaugh’s nightmares, I’m pretty seriously considering live-tweeting the show using the hashtag #rightwingsesamenightmare
The only way it would be better liberal propaganda is if everything was exactly the same except Chamki was secretly from Pakistan or turned out to be in the country illegally in order to gobble up some of those sweet, sweet American entitlements (and cookies).

We’re taking the kids to Sesame Street Live this weekend and this is the description of the show:

No matter where you’re from or where you’ve been, everyone is special – so join in! Elmo, Grover, Abby Cadabby, and their Sesame Street friends welcome Chamki, Grover’s friend from India, to Sesame Street. Together, they explore the universal fun of friendship and celebrate cultural similarities, from singing and dancing, to sharing cookies!

Given that it reads like something out of Rush Limbaugh’s nightmares, I’m pretty seriously considering live-tweeting the show using the hashtag #rightwingsesamenightmare

The only way it would be better liberal propaganda is if everything was exactly the same except Chamki was secretly from Pakistan or turned out to be in the country illegally in order to gobble up some of those sweet, sweet American entitlements (and cookies).

(Source: sesamestreetlive.com)

# comedy # Twitter # internet # daddy blogging # kids # politics # Sesame Street

The Top 5 Posts of 2013

As I did yesterday, I’m once again linking to the top blog posts of the year. These are the posts that drew the most unique eyeballs; the list doesn’t include the About page, where several thousand people each year go to find out whose writing they’re reading, the Ask page, where people write in with questions or to say kind and unkind things to me, or the front page, which is always the top draw since it’s the way that people access the site directly (rather than via some referring site).

Perhaps you missed some of these posts. Or maybe you just want to have another look since it’s been a little while. Feel free, of course, to share them with friends and loved ones because each click tells me that you’d like for me to keep writing these sorts of things.

Here, then, are the Top 5 most viewed posts of 2013:

#5. That time Ari Fleischer explained that he only donates to charity for the tax break and any changes to the tax code would mean he’ll donate less (1/1/13)

#4. “Whither Aristotle?,” a reflection on the decision of my colleagues to eliminate political theory as a subfield of undergraduate study in the Department of Political Science at the University of Nebraska (10/3/13)

#3. That time when Marc Anthony sang “God Bless America” at the MLB All-Star Game and racists went crazy on Twitter because they assumed, wrongly, that Anthony wasn’t American (7/17/13)

#2. “Twitter Assassins,” in which a whole bunch of people went online to reflect on President Obama’s inauguration by calling for someone to assassinate him (1/21/13)

#1. That time when people vented their anger on Twitter and demanded a White History Month since February is Black History Month (2/1/13)

It’s been a fun and fascinating year of writing for me, full of arguments and thoughtful exchanges of ideas. I plan to have a brief reflection tomorrow that looks back at some of the things I learned from blogging this year and looks forward to 2014.

Thanks for reading, for engaging with my ideas, for sharing my blog posts with your friends, and for asking for my thoughts on issues or events as they’ve come up.

Happy New Year!

# Twitter # racism # internet # Obama # politics # MLB # baseball # sports # raison d'être # philosophy # Nebraska # teaching # education # political science # charity # music # holidays

The Top 10 Posts of 2013

In the last couple of days of 2013, by way of reflection on a successful year of blogging, I’ll be linking to my Top 10 posts of the year.

These are the posts that drew the most unique eyeballs; the list doesn’t include the About page, where several thousand people each year go to find out whose writing they’re reading, the Ask page, where people write in with questions or to say kind and unkind things to me, or the front page, which is always the top draw since it’s the way that people access the site directly (rather than via some referring site).

Perhaps you missed some of these posts. Or maybe you just want to have another look since it’s been a little while. Feel free, of course, to share them with friends and loved ones because each click tells me that you’d like for me to keep writing these sorts of things.

Here, then, are the 6th-10th most viewed posts of 2013:

#10. That time the Republican leader of the Oklahoma House of Representatives casually used an anti-Semitic slur during a debate on a bill (4/18/13)

#9. “Here We Are Now Entertain Us,” a manifesto against the whole notion of “edutainment”: that it’s equally if not more important for college courses to be entertaining than educational (5/13/13)

#8. “Althouse: The Clinton clot plot thickens… or thins… with anti-coagulants,” in which a Wisconsin law professor suggests that Hillary Clinton was probably faking a blood clot to avoid testifying about Benghazi (1/1/13)

#7. That time conservative pundit Erick Erickson made a whole bunch of claims about the “real” Jesus, who was wrathful, vengeful, and could definitely throw a haymaker (5/24/13)

#6. That time a graduate student at the University of Nebraska repeatedly used the n-word during a discussion on whether or not student government members should avoid using derogatory language and then tried to turn the whole ensuing mess into a free speech issue (12/3/13)

See you here tomorrow for the Top 5!

# raison d'être # Nebraska # Wisconsin # Clinton # Erickson # Twitter # racism # politics # education # Oklahoma # apology # terrible apologies # religion # Judaism # anti-semitism # internet

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