Another day, another group of sports fans airing their virulent anti-Semitism on Twitter …

Last time, anti-Semitic baseball fans gleefully reacted to the news of Ryan Braun’s PED suspension. This time, anti-Semitic soccer fans are outraged (for reasons that are completely unclear) about Tottenham chairman Daniel Levy’s work to save the Spurs a ton of money in some contract deal that I don’t care about in any way, shape, or form.

Here are a few more of the dozens and dozens, almost all of which are published under the actual names and with the actual photos of the people who wrote them:

I think this one is my favorite:

Levy’s problem, obviously, is letting everyone see the bag of gold he’s wearing around his neck. If he kept the bag of gold at home or in a bank or in the synagogue basement, these guys would be none the wiser and I wouldn’t be writing any of this today.

HT: Matt Langdon.

# anti-semitism # soccer # sports # Twitter # England # Judaism # internet


First came the dramatic discovery of the long-lost remains of King Richard III.
Now, there’s the mystery of the coffin within the coffin.
Archaeologists working at the site in central England where Richard III’s body was found underneath a parking lot are currently puzzling over a sealed lead coffin containing the remains of a yet-to-be-identified person.
The lead coffin was found encased in a larger stone coffin.
The smaller coffin is intact “except for a hole at one end of the casket through which we could tantalizingly see someone’s feet,” said Mathew Morris, the fieldwork director at the site.

So … this whole thing seems unbelievably creepy to me.
Caitlin Fitz Gerald helps to explain why I’m so creeped out and why you should be too, using art:


So, I know the researcher is using words like “tantalizingly” to describe peeking into the lead coffin within the stone coffin.
But, seriously, don’t open the lead coffin.

First came the dramatic discovery of the long-lost remains of King Richard III.

Now, there’s the mystery of the coffin within the coffin.

Archaeologists working at the site in central England where Richard III’s body was found underneath a parking lot are currently puzzling over a sealed lead coffin containing the remains of a yet-to-be-identified person.

The lead coffin was found encased in a larger stone coffin.

The smaller coffin is intact “except for a hole at one end of the casket through which we could tantalizingly see someone’s feet,” said Mathew Morris, the fieldwork director at the site.

So … this whole thing seems unbelievably creepy to me.

Caitlin Fitz Gerald helps to explain why I’m so creeped out and why you should be too, using art:

So, I know the researcher is using words like “tantalizingly” to describe peeking into the lead coffin within the stone coffin.

But, seriously, don’t open the lead coffin.

# England # vampires # news

Happy Royal Baby Day, America.
I’m literally going to go watch my baby now (at swim lessons).

Happy Royal Baby Day, America.

I’m literally going to go watch my baby now (at swim lessons).

# baby # England # Twitter # comedy # daddy blogging # kids # internet

Is a celebrity who happens to be Jewish necessarily a Jewish celebrity?

Anshel Pfeffer asks a pretty interesting question in a review of the new Amy Winehouse exhibit at London’s Jewish Museum.

As my friend Rabbi Jason Miller points out, and as the enduring popularity of Adam Sandler’s old Hanukhah song proves, there are lots of people out there who, for some reason, really want to know whether their favorite celebrities are Jewish or not. But the difference between being a Jewish celebrity and a celebrity who happens to be Jewish is an interesting distinction that might be underexplored.

The whole review — “Remembering Amy Winehouse as the Jew she was not" — is in today’s Haaretz.

# Judaism # music # religion # Winehouse # England

European-Hotel-Room-Ghazi

Over on Twitter a few days ago, Kelsey Atherton suggested that we replace -gate with -ghazi when we talk about scandals from now on … so I’m jumping on that train right now.

Here’s what I have to say about the conservative firestorm surrounding Joe Biden’s European Vacation (which incidentally is a movie that Hollywood should immediately put into production, starring Chevy Chase as Joe Biden; I’ll take an EP credit):

Conservatives went absolutely ballistic that the administration didn’t spend nearly enough money on security for our consulate in Benghazi. Now the exact same people are losing their minds over the astronomical cost of providing security for the vice president while he travels.

Which is it, guys? Should we be willing to spend what it actually costs or shouldn’t we?

# Biden # movies # Europe # Libya # politics # news # France # England


European Jewish Congress President Dr. Moshe Kantor called for an apology Sunday from Britain’s Sunday Times, which published a cartoon of Israel’s Prime Minister Binyamin Netanyahu building a wall on the bodies of Arabs. The cartoon, which appears on International Holocaust Remembrance Day, depicts the blood of the Arabs as cement.
Many observers found the cartoon reminiscent of blood libels against Jews, and noted a similarity to anti-Semitic cartoons published by Nazi newspaper Der Stürmer in the leadup to the Holocaust.

In case you think someone might be stretching the comparison and seeing anti-Semitism where none exists, here’s a blood libel cartoon from Der Stürmer:

The simple truth is this:
When people are overtly anti-Semitic in their attempts to criticize the Israeli government, it gets more difficult for those of who aren’t anti-Semites to do so.
In other words, rather than successfully making public a critique of the Netanyahu government, disgusting cartoons like this one can actually have a chilling effect on other critics of the Israeli government.
It’s very easy to make compelling arguments against the right-wing government of Benjamin Netanyahu without even the slightest whiff of anti-Semitism … which is why a cartoon like this makes clear that some critics of Israel’s government just hate Jews in general.

European Jewish Congress President Dr. Moshe Kantor called for an apology Sunday from Britain’s Sunday Times, which published a cartoon of Israel’s Prime Minister Binyamin Netanyahu building a wall on the bodies of Arabs. The cartoon, which appears on International Holocaust Remembrance Day, depicts the blood of the Arabs as cement.

Many observers found the cartoon reminiscent of blood libels against Jews, and noted a similarity to anti-Semitic cartoons published by Nazi newspaper Der Stürmer in the leadup to the Holocaust.

In case you think someone might be stretching the comparison and seeing anti-Semitism where none exists, here’s a blood libel cartoon from Der Stürmer:

The simple truth is this:

When people are overtly anti-Semitic in their attempts to criticize the Israeli government, it gets more difficult for those of who aren’t anti-Semites to do so.

In other words, rather than successfully making public a critique of the Netanyahu government, disgusting cartoons like this one can actually have a chilling effect on other critics of the Israeli government.

It’s very easy to make compelling arguments against the right-wing government of Benjamin Netanyahu without even the slightest whiff of anti-Semitism … which is why a cartoon like this makes clear that some critics of Israel’s government just hate Jews in general.

(Source: israelnationalnews.com)

# Israel # anti-Semitism # England # media # cartoon # Palestinians # Holocaust # politics # news

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