If you read any of the news about Hobby Lobby and its fight against (some forms of) contraception, you won’t be able to avoid being stunned by the complete and utter nonsense of the claims that are being made by the company’s owners.
They don’t object to including contraception in their health plan, but they object to including the morning-after pill (which is generally understood to be emergency contraception but which they have decided for themselves is actually an abortion-inducing drug):


"All they’re asking for is a narrow exemption from the law that says they don’t have to provide drugs they believe cause abortions," Hobby Lobby attorney Kyle Duncan, a general counsel for the Becket Fund for Religious Liberty, told CNN affiliate KFOR in November. "Our basic point is the government can’t put a corporation in the position of choosing between its faith and following the law."


The Supreme Court has rejected their request for an injunction while their lawsuit is pending, as they’re seeking a religious exemption but are not a religious organization. And so they say they’re prepared to pay fines of more than a million dollars a day after January 1 as they await the results of their lawsuit.
Here’s a handy chart with the stark differences between an emergency contraception pill and an abortion-inducing pill.
The bottom line is this: If you own a company and don’t understand how women’s bodies work, you might end up having to pay a million dollars a day to remain faithful to your understanding of what contraception means.

If you read any of the news about Hobby Lobby and its fight against (some forms of) contraception, you won’t be able to avoid being stunned by the complete and utter nonsense of the claims that are being made by the company’s owners.

They don’t object to including contraception in their health plan, but they object to including the morning-after pill (which is generally understood to be emergency contraception but which they have decided for themselves is actually an abortion-inducing drug):

"All they’re asking for is a narrow exemption from the law that says they don’t have to provide drugs they believe cause abortions," Hobby Lobby attorney Kyle Duncan, a general counsel for the Becket Fund for Religious Liberty, told CNN affiliate KFOR in November. "Our basic point is the government can’t put a corporation in the position of choosing between its faith and following the law."

The Supreme Court has rejected their request for an injunction while their lawsuit is pending, as they’re seeking a religious exemption but are not a religious organization. And so they say they’re prepared to pay fines of more than a million dollars a day after January 1 as they await the results of their lawsuit.

Here’s a handy chart with the stark differences between an emergency contraception pill and an abortion-inducing pill.

The bottom line is this: If you own a company and don’t understand how women’s bodies work, you might end up having to pay a million dollars a day to remain faithful to your understanding of what contraception means.

# health care # corporations # Facebook # Supreme Court # religion # women # politics # news

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  1. willnobilis reblogged this from swordofomens
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  4. swordofomens reblogged this from theramblingfangirl
  5. neurotrophins reblogged this from kohenari
  6. crystalxxballer reblogged this from kohenari and added:
    Damn it, I love hobby lobby. No more business from me though.
  7. excitablehonky replied:
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  9. turnabout reblogged this from kohenari and added:
    So this company is fine with family planning, they just don’t actually believe that the morning after pill isn’t an...
  10. kohenari posted this

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